Hispanic Federation: A Balance Sheet of 2021

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The Hispanic Federation used hotlines, text messages and phone calls to reach some 3.5 million actual and potential Latino voters.

Photo: Justin Lane / EPA / .

In my first column of 2022 I will finish telling you about the main achievements of the Hispanic Federation during 2021.

Despite the obstacles of COVID 19, in 2021 our organization continued and expanded its educational efforts. To do so, we provide nearly 15,000 students and their families with information on distance learning, college and career readiness, and financial and academic aid.

“That help,” explains Jessica Guzmán, Vice President of Programs, “is provided through the online Popular Assemblies on back-to-school, the Hispanic Education Summit, and the Pathways initiatives, which help families with preschool-age children and sons and daughters who wish to enter university ”.

The beneficiaries included 800 college students in New York, Connecticut, Florida and Rhode Island. In addition, the CREAR Futuros Initiative offered specialized workshops and other resources online, due to the pandemic.

“And thanks to the support of the Morgan Stanley Foundation, in 2022 we will implement CREAR Futuros in Chicago,” adds Jessica Guzmán.

During 2021, the Hispanic Federation continued to work hard for the financial stability of our community. We did this in collaboration with Google’s community arm in the Latino Digital Accelerator initiative, which provided some 11,000 Latinos and Latinas with knowledge and skills to use computer systems and programs.

“This initiative, which is implemented in 24 community agencies in 11 continental states and Puerto Rico,” says Jessica, “made it possible to obtain 1,200 new jobs and salary increases of about $ 17,000 per year, on average.”

Another area of ​​our activity that I am very proud of is the civic engagement of our community. That participation is affected by the redistricting and manipulation of that process, which occurs after each national census and is known as gerrymandering.

“The Hispanic Federation and several of its member organizations worked hard to combat these maneuvers,” says Jessica Guzmán. “For example, creating the website redistricting academia dot org, with bilingual information about the process.”

In addition, the federation used hotlines, text messages and phone calls to reach some 3.5 million actual and potential Latino voters.

Another fundamental aspect of our work was the assistance to immigrants. During 2021, almost 9,700 Latino immigrants obtained direct services from the federation with their citizenship procedures, English and civics classes and preparation for immigration interviews. In addition, our Hispanic Federation awarded 520 DACA-protected youth grants for immigration processing, college tuition, and essential personal expenses.

And to end this summary, the Hispanic Federation awarded more than a million and a half dollars to a score of community agencies that combat ethnic or racial hatred and that help excluded workers.

And here ends my first column of 2022.

To learn more about the Hispanic Federation, call our toll-free and bilingual line at (844) 432-9832, or visit www.hispanicfederation.org, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Have a happy Three Kings Day!

Until the next column!

Frankie Miranda is the president of the Hispanic Federation

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